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Green Curry of Mussels, Monkfish, Wild Ginger, Asian Vegetables and Sweet Basil with Vermicelli Noodles
Green Curry of Mussels, Monkfish, Wild Ginger, Asian Vegetables and Sweet Basil with Vermicelli Noodles
Thai
Main
45 mins
Seafood
Medium
Serves
2 to 3

This dish has a lot of ingredients, but don't let that put you off. It's not that complex to make and it's well worth the effort, plus you can keep the remaining paste in the fridge for a 2-3 weeks and its amazing with chicken or fish

Recipe courtesy of
Articuleat
Ingredients

For the curry

  • 2kg, large mussels, washed, beards and barnacles removed
  • 200g, monkfish, skinned and sliced into 2cm thick chunks
  • 150g, thin rice vermicelli noodles, blanched for 1 minute in boiling salt water and then refreshed under cold running water
  • 20g, baby corn, sliced into thin roll-cuts
  • 20g, white daikon, peeled and sliced into thin roll-cuts and braised in water until softened (about 5 minutes)
  • 3, long red chillies, sliced into roll cuts
  • 3, long green chillies, sliced into roll cuts
  • 10g, green beans, topped and tailed, cut into 2cm long chunks
  • 150g, green curry paste
  • 200ml, fish stock
  • 150ml, coconut oil (crack)
  • 300ml, coconut cream
  • 1 tablespoon wild ginger, grachai, peeled and thinly sliced (regular ginger will work fine)
  • 20g, Thai basil, washed and picked
  • 10g, coriander, washed and picked
  • 2 tablespoons, fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon palm sugar
  • 1 lime, chopped into cheeks for garnish
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt

For the curry paste (makes around 1kg of paste)

  • 150g, fresh birds eye chillies, stems removed, roasted over a barbecue or in an oven for around 10 minutes until softened and a little smoky
  • 150g, fresh long green chillies, stems and seeds removed, thinly sliced, roasted over a barbecue or in an oven for around 10 minutes until softened and a little smoky
  • 250g, banana shallots, peeled, roughly chopped (use Thai shallots if possible)
  • 250g, peeled garlic
  • 100g, peeled lemongrass, topped and tailed, outside shell removed, sliced into small chunks
  • 30g, galingale, peeled and cut into small chunks
  • 20g, coriander roots, cleaned and finely sliced
  • 30g, fresh red turmeric, peeled (watch the hands, this stuff stains)
  • 20g wild ginger, krachai, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon, roasted gapi paste, fermented shrimp paste (leave this out if vegetarian)
  • 1 tablespoon, whole white peppercorns, lightly toasted in dry pan
  • 3 teaspoons, whole coriander seeds, lightly toasted in dry pan
  • 2 teaspoons, cumin seeds, lightly toasted in dry pan
  • 2 pieces, roughly 2g, mace, lightly roasted in pan
  • 1-2 teaspoons coarse sea salt
Method
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Method
  1. Firstly make the curry paste. Using a pestle and mortar individually pound up all the fresh ingredients separately until they are combined into one complete paste. For example, start with the lemongrass, as it is tough, chop it into small chunks to make it easier on yourself then pound using a pestle and mortar until all is mixed into one paste. Next pound the galangal, as it is also tough, using the same process, then the chillies, garlic etc. Once all are pounded individually, combine them in the pestle until they are all together as one paste.
  2. Meanwhile toast the spices in a pan. However, bear in mind that these all toast at different rates so start with the coriander seeds, moving constantly, as soon as they start to smoke a little add the mace and cumin. Keep moving these for one more minute and then add the whole white peppercorns and remove from the heat. The heat from the hot spices is enough to toast the white peppercorns, if they remain on the heat they will pop and explode. Once toasted, spice-grind these spices to a fine powder and pound them into your curry paste. Keep pestle and mortaring away until you are left with a slightly moist, slightly coarse paste, with no identifiable chunks of any ingredients, everything should be equally pounded into a paste with no lumps.
  3. Store the paste in an air tight container with cling film acting as a barrier against oxidisation. In a fridge, the paste will last for 2-3 weeks. It will slowly lose flavour over time, the paste turning brown in colour is an obvious sign of oxidisation which will change the flavour.
  4. Next, heat the coconut oil in a wok, when bubbling, add 200g green curry paste and keep stirring and scraping regularly until paste begins to split like scrambled eggs and darkens slightly. You will also notice that the smell of the ingredients changes from raw, to a fragrant, as all the ingredients cook together as one. At this point add the palm sugar and allow to cook into the paste for one minute until the paste darkens slightly as the sugar caramelises.
  5. Now it’s time to let the curry out. Add all the fish stock and half of the coconut cream, the daikon, green beans and baby corn. Stir to combine and then cover and bring to a simmer, cook out for around five minutes until all vegetables are cooked.
  6. Next drop in the monkfish tails and the mussels and put the lid back on to simmer for a further 3-4 minutes until the monkfish is cooked through and the mussels have all opened, discard any that remain closed. At this point the curry would have thickened a little, so finish off the remaining coconut cream and the fish sauce. Lastly, add Thai basil, green and red chilli roll-cuts, fish sauce to taste and wild ginger, fold these ingredients in carefully as you don’t want to destroy the fish, then serve immediately.
  7. Serve the curry in a bowls, place portions of the cooked noodles in the bowls and then serve the loose curry over the top of the noodles. The curry should be thick enough to coat the noodles, rich, creamy, salty, spicy and fishy, the magic is in the balance.

The Pass was created to help the many people now struggling to feed themselves and their families as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic. If you like or use this recipe, please consider making a small donation to Hospitality Action to help those whose livelihoods have all but disappeared.

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