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Steak fatoush salad with grapes and tomatoes
Steak fatoush salad with grapes and tomatoes
Middle Eastern
Main
30 mins
Beef
Easy
Serves
a glorious dinner for 2

The days when a meal without meat was not considered a meal are

long gone in most homes – certainly in ours. The current mindset of the ‘fooderati’ has been neatly phrased by Michael Pollan: ‘Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants’. Meat is a treat, a luxury item almost. Going to the butchers’ shop is not a chore, it is an indulgence, and here in London we are spoiled with some terrific butchers selling great meat. Frank Godfrey in Islington is where we buy our meat for the restaurant. Not only is the quality superb but the service and commitment make working with them a delight – they will get whatever cut of whatever animal we want, trim it for us in any way we ask and deliver it with a smile.

For our home supplies we go to Moen’s in Clapham – the most wonderful shop. They always have great canned and dried goods; they bring in heirloom potatoes, new season garlic and foraged mushrooms; and they have the most wonderfully macabre window displays. For Christmas they hang two big turkey carcasses in full feather, wings and tails splayed to show their impressive plumage. The mums of Clapham are horrified, the kids love it. The meat they sell is superb, especially the beef steaks they so expertly age: full of flavour, tender but not mushy, and if you gasp a little when you come to pay, you know it’ll be worth it.

This dish is a good way to stretch a good steak. When we first came to this country and worked on lowly chefs’ salaries, this was our treat: a great steak, slices of sourdough cooked in the same pan to absorb as much of its precious flavour, the best tomatoes we could find, and some herbs for interest. Nowadays we can afford a bit more steak, but this dish is still a treat for us. There aren’t many dishes that you can bring to the table fifteen minutes after you started cooking, and that are so smart and tasty.

Honey & Co. At Home: Middle-Eastern recipes from our kitchen by Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich, published by Pavilion Books. Image credit to Patricia Niven.

Recipe courtesy of
Ingredients
  • 2 knobs of butter (about 10g/1⁄3oz each)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 300g / 10 1⁄2 oz aged prime sirloin steak
  • 1 red onion, peeled and sliced in rings
  • 2 thick slices of sourdough bread
  • 1 small bunch of red grapes
  • 3 large tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 small bunch each of parsley and mint, leaves picked
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Method
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Method
  1. Get everything ready before you start.
  2. Heat a large solid-based frying pan over a medium heat, add one knob of butter and the olive oil to the pan. Season your steak generously with salt and black pepper and lay it flat to one side of the frying pan. On the other side of the pan, place the sliced onions.
  3. Fry for 3 minutes, moving the onion rings around so they don’t burn.
  4. Flip the steak and lift up the onions to sit on top of it. Place the two slices of bread in the same frying pan to soak up all the fat and juices, and fry for 2 minutes. Flip the bread (it should be all golden) and lift the steak on top of it. Add the grapes and the second knob of butter. Mix them around and fry for 1 more minute before removing the pan from the heat. Allow the steak to rest on the bread for a few minutes.
  5. Slice the steak thinly, rip the bread into chunks and mix with all the remaining ingredients to create the nicest salad ever.

The Pass was created to help the many people now struggling to feed themselves and their families as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic. If you like or use this recipe, please consider making a small donation to Hospitality Action to help those whose livelihoods have all but disappeared.

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